San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge Skyway

Oakland, California

 

Project Description

The Skyway portion of the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge Replacement consists of dual precast segmental structures measuring 1.2 miles in length with a width of 2x26 meters. This structure is unique in its size and complexity.


As the longest section of the new East Span at 1.2 miles, the Skyway’s graceful parallel decks will transform the appearance of the Bay Bridge, as well as the way motorists experience their drive, thanks to sweeping, unencumbered views of the Bay. The sleek side-by-side east and westbound decks arc out gracefully over the Bay, a distinct change from the gray steel truss box of the original bridge that now carries traffic.


The Skyway’s decks, which accommodate five lanes of traffic and include 10-foot-wide shoulders to help keep traffic moving, are composed of 452 pre-cast concrete segments (standing three stories high, 90 feet wide and 25 feet long). Combined, the Skyway segments contain approximately 200 million pounds of structural steel, 120 million pounds of reinforcing steel, 200,000 linear feet of piling and about 450,000 cubic yards of concrete, weighing up to 800 tons each. The surface of the deck is paved with durable and weather resistant high-strength polyester concrete. Fabricated in Stockton, California, the deck sections were transported by barge to the project site. These are the largest segments of their kind ever cast, and they were lifted into place by custom-made winches. In special instances such as these, segments on opposite sides of a pier must be lifted incrementally in order to avoid over-stressing the pier columns. This degree of complexity in construction requires a significant amount of engineering by the contractor.


Prime contractor Kiewit/FCI/Manson (Joint Venture) completed construction of the Skyway in 2008 at a cost of $1.2 billion..

 

         Jason Hatcher's Role

Jason Hatcher was employed as a Lead Senior Draftsman by Parsons from September 2001 - June 2007. During that time, Jason was part of the drafting team for the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge Skyway, detailing various superstructure segments.